Friday, February 17, 2012

Partnerships Session Spotlight: Disrupting the Traditional Drug Development Process—How Will Participatory Medicine Drive Innovation in Clinical Research?

Tomasz Sablinski, Founder of Transparency Life Sciences, recently discussed with the Burrill Report how he believes that crowd sourcing clinical trials can lead to improved drug development by creating transparency in clinical trials.  By creating a transparent system through crowd sourcing with moderation from both experienced patient and doctor moderators, this broken drug development system can become a new, efficient pipeline for drug development.  Listen to Sablinski's podcast here.

At the 2012 Partnerships in Clinical Trials, Tomasz Sablinski will be a part of the "Disrupting the Traditional Drug Development Process—How Will Participatory Medicine Drive Innovation in Clinical Research?" Panel.  If you'd like to attend this panel discussion with Tomas Sablinski and other industry leaders, register to join us today and mention code XP1700BLOG and receive a discount of 15% off the standard rate!

Featured Session: Disrupting the Traditional Drug Development Process—How Will Participatory Medicine Drive Innovation in Clinical Research?

Perspectives from:
Gareth Morgan, Head Global Portfolio Management, SHIONOGI INC..
Deirdre BeVard, Vice President, Development Operations, ENDO PHARMACEUTICALS
James Surowiecki, Author, THE WISDOM OF CROWDS
Seth Ginsburg, President, GLOBAL HEALTH LIVING FOUNDATION
Tomasz Sablinski, Founder, TRANSPARENCY LIFE SCIENCES


About the session:
Participatory medicine allows networked patients to shift from being mere passengers to responsible drivers of their health, and in which providers encourage and value them as full partners. This session examines what participatory medicine means to pharma, why it matters, and how it will revolutionize the clinical trial process. This session will answer:
  • • How will companies ensure that patient needs are understood, assuaged, and preempted as much as is feasibly possible?
  • • How does health information from patient interviews, face-to-face exams and other communication between providers and patients,
  • such as email or e-visits play a role in treatment decisions, ongoing health monitoring, adherence and results?
  • • Is the data clinically valid? Can we crowd source medicine?




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